Childhood Cancer and the World Cancer Declaration


cancerfreeToday, February 15th, is the annual International Childhood Cancer Day, a day on which we try to focus attention on all the millions of Children with cancer that are fighting the battle of and for their lives.

Many of these Little Fighters are hampered even more in their fight due to the fact that they are living in a country where knowledge about Childhood cancer is insufficient and access to affordable care is but a pipe-dream. This is costing many young lives unnecessarily and we need to do something about it!

The Little Fighters Cancer Trust felt that, on this International Childhood Cancer Day, it is important that we bring attention to the World Cancer Declaration which is a call to action from the global cancer community:

“We the Global Cancer Community, call on governments, international governmental organisations, the international donor community, development agencies, professional organizations, the private sector and all civil society to take immediate steps to slow and ultimately reverse the growth in deaths from cancer, by committing to the targets set out below and providing resources and political backing for the priority actions needed to achieve them.”

Cancer is a significant cause of childhood death in developing countries. While there have been remarkable advances in the treatment of childhood cancer over the last decades and survival rates are 80% and higher for some cancers such as leukaemia, survival rates in many low and middle-income countries are sadly 50% and lower.

Lack of knowledge is often the reason why childhood cancer is often detected too late for effective treatment. Added to this, appropriate treatment and care, including palliative care and pain relief is often not available or affordable.

As is already the case in high-income countries (HICs), in a growing number of middle-income countries (MICs), cancer is now the leading cause of non-accidental deaths, among children and adolescents.

The huge divide between high income and LMIC contexts in childhood cancer survival is unacceptable and a matter of the right to health and social justice for children.

For far too long, the rights and needs of children/adolescents with cancer have been marginalised and neglected. While deaths due to infectious diseases have been significantly reduced, deaths due to childhood cancer are increasing.

 

world-cancer-declaration

The World Cancer Declaration is a tool to help bring the growing cancer crisis to the attention of government leaders and health policymakers in order to significantly reduce the global cancer burden by 2025.

Sign The World Cancer Declaration HERE

 

The World Cancer Declaration

The World Cancer Declaration calls upon government leaders and health policy-makers to significantly reduce the global cancer burden, promote greater equity, and integrate cancer control into the world health and development agenda.

Building on the Global NCD Action Plan (2013-2020) agreed by Member States at the World Health Assembly in May 2013, the global cancer community has identified a set of immediate actions for all stakeholders, in particular governments, to advance progress towards the 9 World Cancer Declaration targets and the overarching goal.

A refreshed World Cancer Declaration was launched during the 2013 World Cancer Leaders’ Summit in Cape Town. In light of the recent developments in the fight against NCDs and with the expiration of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) fast approaching, UICC saw the growing need to more closely align the Declaration’s targets and priority actions with the recently adopted global Non-Communicable Disease (NCD) framework, and the ongoing discussions relating to the Post-2015 development agenda.

Check out the refreshed Declaration here: http://www.uicc.org/world-cancer-declaration and promote it within your organisation!

 

Overarching Goal and 9 Targets of The World Cancer Declaration

Overarching Goal: There will be major reductions in premature deaths from cancer, and improvements in quality of life and cancer survival rates.

9 targets of the World Cancer Declaration

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About LFCT

This is a blog about CHILDHOOD CANCER and CHILDHOOD CANCER AWARENESS Little Fighters Cancer Trust is a non-profit organisation that offers support and aid to Children with Cancer and their families. When a child is diagnosed with cancer it affects the whole family. One of the parents, usually the mother, must give up their job to care for the child and this creates financial problems for the family. In South Africa especially the majority of these families are not well-to-do; many of them are rural. A diagnosis of cancer can wipe out any family’s finances, let alone a poor family. The costs of special medications, special diets, hospital stays, transport to and from the hospital or clinic and accommodation and food costs for the mother who spends most of the time at her child’s bedside are astronomical. These are the people and problems that fall through the cracks, and these are the people that Little Fighters Cancer Trust has pledged to help in any way possible. LFCT takes a holistic approach to assisting the Children with Cancer and their Families, with the main aim to be the preservation of individual dignity and pride. Little Fighters Cancer Trust also focuses on promotion and advocacy of National Childhood Cancer Awareness in an effort to increase awareness of Early Warning Signs of Childhood Cancer. This would result in earlier diagnosis, giving the Child with Cancer more of a chance at Treatment and Survival. See "About" for more Background info

Posted on 16 February, 2016, in Blog and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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