Kuruman Hospital Introduces Patient Transport & Overnight Accommodation


kuruman hospFor some rural patients, hundreds of kilometres and long nights spent sleeping in the cold can stand between them and care for complicated illnesses like cancer and drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB).

One Northern Cape hospital is making the journey a little easier.

The two new park homes are equipped with equipped with beds, showers and toilets

In many places, care for complicated illnesses such as cancer and even DR-TB remain centralised at provincial or specialist hospitals.

To reach these services, many rural patients must travel to their nearest local hospital to catch patient transport buses that will ferry them to the larger specialist or provincial hospitals farther afield for treatment.

In areas of the Northern Cape, patients seeking treatment including chemotherapy and hysterectomies must travel about 230 km from Kuruman to Kimberley for such care. These patients must arrive at Kuruman Hospital the afternoon before their bus patient transport shuttle leaves for Kimberley Provincial Hospital the next morning at 3 am.

For those already suffering from debilitating illnesses, this meant spending a cold night sleeping on the floor until now.

The John Taolo Gaetsewe Developmental Trust recently donated two park homes equipped with beds, showers and toilets to Kuruman Hospital.

The hospital had cases where patients slept on floors and benches,” said the trust’s communications officer Modiri Gabaatlhole in a statement. “These desperate patients are now using the park homes.”

Launched in 2002 by former Minister of Minerals and Energy Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, the trust funds projects in the John Taolo Gaetsewe District Municipality.

Patients can now sleep in the park homes before departing early from Kuruman Hospital or returning late from the provincial hospital to ensure they do not have to travel in the middle of the night or sleep on the floor.

Patrick Mosime regularly attends the provincial hospital for chemotherapy and said the park homes have made a big difference to him and others.

More than 165 villages surround Kuruman and the farthest villages among these can be hundreds of kilometres away from the town and only accessible via poor roads.

 

Source: Health-e News

 

 

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About LFCT

This is a blog about CHILDHOOD CANCER and CHILDHOOD CANCER AWARENESS Little Fighters Cancer Trust is a non-profit organisation that offers support and aid to Children with Cancer and their families. When a child is diagnosed with cancer it affects the whole family. One of the parents, usually the mother, must give up their job to care for the child and this creates financial problems for the family. In South Africa especially the majority of these families are not well-to-do; many of them are rural. A diagnosis of cancer can wipe out any family’s finances, let alone a poor family. The costs of special medications, special diets, hospital stays, transport to and from the hospital or clinic and accommodation and food costs for the mother who spends most of the time at her child’s bedside are astronomical. These are the people and problems that fall through the cracks, and these are the people that Little Fighters Cancer Trust has pledged to help in any way possible. LFCT takes a holistic approach to assisting the Children with Cancer and their Families, with the main aim to be the preservation of individual dignity and pride. Little Fighters Cancer Trust also focuses on promotion and advocacy of National Childhood Cancer Awareness in an effort to increase awareness of Early Warning Signs of Childhood Cancer. This would result in earlier diagnosis, giving the Child with Cancer more of a chance at Treatment and Survival. See "About" for more Background info

Posted on 8 March, 2016, in Blog and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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