Could Handheld Scanner make Brain Tumour Removal More Complete & Reduce Recurrence?


A handheld device that resembles a laser pointer could someday help surgeons remove all of the cells in a brain tumour

A handheld device that resembles a laser pointer could someday help surgeons remove all of the cells in a brain tumour

Cancerous brain tumours are notorious for growing back despite surgical attempts to remove them — and for leading to a dire prognosis for patients.

But scientists are developing a new way to try to root out malignant cells during surgery so fewer or none get left behind to form new tumours.

The method, reported in the journal ACS Nano, could someday vastly improve the outlook for patients.

Moritz F. Kircher and colleagues at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center point out that malignant brain tumours, particularly the kind known as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), are among the toughest to beat.

Although relatively rare, GBM is highly aggressive, and its cells multiply rapidly. Surgical removal is one of the main weapons doctors have to treat brain tumours. The problem is that currently, there’s no way to know if they have taken out all of the cancerous cells. And removing extra material “just in case” isn’t a good option in the brain, which controls so many critical processes.

The techniques surgeons have at their disposal today are not accurate enough to identify all the cells that need to be excised. So Kircher’s team decided to develop a new method to fill that gap.

The researchers used a handheld device resembling a laser pointer that can detect “Raman nanoprobes” with very high accuracy. These nanoprobes are injected the day prior to the operation and go specifically to tumour cells, and not to normal brain cells.

Using a handheld Raman scanner in a mouse model that mimics human GBM, the researchers successfully identified and removed all malignant cells in the rodents’ brains. Also, because the technique involves steps that have already made it to human testing for other purposes, the researchers conclude that it has the potential to move readily into clinical trials. Surgeons might be able to use the device in the future to treat other types of brain cancer, they say.

 

Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided byAmerican Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

 

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About LFCT

This is a blog about CHILDHOOD CANCER and CHILDHOOD CANCER AWARENESS Little Fighters Cancer Trust is a non-profit organisation that offers support and aid to Children with Cancer and their families. When a child is diagnosed with cancer it affects the whole family. One of the parents, usually the mother, must give up their job to care for the child and this creates financial problems for the family. In South Africa especially the majority of these families are not well-to-do; many of them are rural. A diagnosis of cancer can wipe out any family’s finances, let alone a poor family. The costs of special medications, special diets, hospital stays, transport to and from the hospital or clinic and accommodation and food costs for the mother who spends most of the time at her child’s bedside are astronomical. These are the people and problems that fall through the cracks, and these are the people that Little Fighters Cancer Trust has pledged to help in any way possible. LFCT takes a holistic approach to assisting the Children with Cancer and their Families, with the main aim to be the preservation of individual dignity and pride. Little Fighters Cancer Trust also focuses on promotion and advocacy of National Childhood Cancer Awareness in an effort to increase awareness of Early Warning Signs of Childhood Cancer. This would result in earlier diagnosis, giving the Child with Cancer more of a chance at Treatment and Survival. See "About" for more Background info

Posted on 18 March, 2016, in Blog, Research and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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