Exercise as a Complementary Therapy


Treatment of childhood cancer is associated with a spectrum of late effects, including impaired growth and development, cognitive dysfunction, diminished neurological function, cardiopulmonary compromise, musculoskeletal sequelae, and secondary malignancy. Therefore, attention today is focused not only on survival but also on the quality of survival.

Impaired physical fitness has been reported during and after childhood cancer treatment. Impaired physical fitness typically includes reduced cardiopulmonary function, decreased muscle strength, fatigue, and altered physical function.

Treatments for childhood cancer, including radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and surgery, can result in acute and long-term injury to the heart, lungs, and skeletal muscles, systems necessary for optimal physical fitness

Exercise intervention has the potential to improve cardiopulmonary and musculoskeletal function, perhaps preventing long-term deficits in physical fitness if incorporated during or soon after treatment in children with cancer diagnoses.

Survivors face unique challenges related to the risk of cancer recurrence and the development of other chronic diseases. The potential benefits of exercise during and after treatment are significant and research has proved its effectiveness.

 

Exercise as a Complementary Therapy

Studies in paediatric oncology have shown a positive effect of physical activity on disease and treatment-related side effects.

Research findings confirm that clinical exercise interventions are feasible and safe, especially with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (ALL) patients and during medical treatment.  Positive effects were found on exercisefatigue, strength, and quality of life.

Some children with cancer can benefit from simple exercises such as wrapping silly putty around the hands of a physical therapist. The exercise helps strengthen their hands where neuropathy has developed as a result of chemotherapy.

The Single studies present positive effects on the immune system, body composition, sleep, activity levels, and various aspects of physical functioning.

The evidence for exercise interventions in paediatric oncology is rated level “3.” Although the results are very promising, future research of high methodological quality and focusing on child-specific aspects is needed to establish evidence-based exercise recommendations, particularly for childhood cancer patients.

Most people with cancer notice that they have a lot less energy. During chemotherapy and radiation, most patients have fatigue. Fatigue is when your body and brain feel tired. This tiredness does not get better with rest. For many, fatigue is severe and limits their activity. But inactivity leads to muscle wasting and loss of function.

An aerobic training program can help break this cycle. In research studies, regular exercise has been linked to reduced fatigue. It’s also linked to being able to do normal daily activities without major problems. An aerobic exercise program can be prescribed as treatment for fatigue in cancer patients. Talk with your doctor about this.

 

Research

A growing body of research now suggests that exercise may not only help protect people from developing cancer but also may increase survival in those already diagnosed.

  • A 2005 prospective, observational study, which followed almost 3000 women diagnosed with non-metastatic breast cancer, found that those who engaged in moderate physical activity — equivalent to walking 3-5 hours each week at a modest pace — significantly lowered their risk of dying from breast cancer compared with their more sedentary peers.
  • Exercise may also enhance survival for those diagnosed with non-metastatic colorectal cancer. In one observational study which followed 573 women diagnosed with stage I, II, or III colorectal cancer, those who were physically active after their diagnosis, regardless of their pre-diagnosis exercise regimen, were less likely to die from cancer or in general. And the more exercise they did, the better their odds became: Those who engaged in 6 or more hours of moderate exercise each week, including walking, bicycling, swimming, and running, reduced their risk of dying from cancer by about half compared with their peers who exercised less than 1 hour per week.

The decreased level of activity present in children who have leukaemia has been studied extensively. Implementing physical fitness programs, both during the acute hospitalisation phase and following the cancer treatment, may be beneficial for decreasing side effects, such as osteoporosis, decreased muscle tone and slowing the weight gain often associated with post cancer treatment. These programs will also assist in establishing healthy lifestyle habits for decreasing secondary cancer risks in this population.

A 3-week in-patient walking program intervention consisting of 12 minutes of daily walking significantly improved fatigue and decreased symptoms of distress and depression in patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation.

Another study evaluating the effects of increased fitness on decreasing osteoporosis for children undergoing treatment for ALL did not show any benefit; however, the exercise intervention group did regain their pre-treatment weight through significantly faster weight loss compared with the control group. The authors postulated that the lack of improvement in bone mineral density was due to the low level of patient adherence to the fitness program and recommended that future studies find methods to increase patient participation.

The effects of physical exercise training interventions for childhood cancer participants are not yet convincing due to small numbers of participants and insufficient study methodology. Despite that, first results show a trend towards an improved physical fitness in the intervention group compared to the control group.

 

 

Read more about how Exercise as a Complementary Therapy is administered, possible side-effects and risks etc., on our static Complementary & Alternative Therapies page, Exercise

 

Disclaimer:

Please note that the Little Fighters Cancer Trust shares information regarding various types of cancer treatments on this blog merely for informational use. LFCT does not endorse or promote any specific cancer treatments – we believe that the public should be informed but that the option is theirs to take as to what treatments are to be used.

Always consult your medical practitioner prior to taking any other medication, natural or otherwise.

 

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About LFCT

This is a blog about CHILDHOOD CANCER and CHILDHOOD CANCER AWARENESS Little Fighters Cancer Trust is a non-profit organisation that offers support and aid to Children with Cancer and their families. When a child is diagnosed with cancer it affects the whole family. One of the parents, usually the mother, must give up their job to care for the child and this creates financial problems for the family. In South Africa especially the majority of these families are not well-to-do; many of them are rural. A diagnosis of cancer can wipe out any family’s finances, let alone a poor family. The costs of special medications, special diets, hospital stays, transport to and from the hospital or clinic and accommodation and food costs for the mother who spends most of the time at her child’s bedside are astronomical. These are the people and problems that fall through the cracks, and these are the people that Little Fighters Cancer Trust has pledged to help in any way possible. LFCT takes a holistic approach to assisting the Children with Cancer and their Families, with the main aim to be the preservation of individual dignity and pride. Little Fighters Cancer Trust also focuses on promotion and advocacy of National Childhood Cancer Awareness in an effort to increase awareness of Early Warning Signs of Childhood Cancer. This would result in earlier diagnosis, giving the Child with Cancer more of a chance at Treatment and Survival. See "About" for more Background info

Posted on 20 April, 2016, in Alternative Treatments, Blog and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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