Nelson Mandela Children’s Hospital Finally Opens


nmchWOW!!! At last!! This going to mean SO much to our Little Fighters   

The Nelson Mandela Children’s Hospital, an idea that began with a vision by Nelson Mandela as far back as his presidency in the 1990s, has finally become a reality.

Thank You, Tata Madiba!!   

The hospital, overseen by the Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund, along with various local and international partners, is dedicated exclusively to paediatric medicine and care. It will welcome its first patients TODAY, 2 December 2016!!

The world-class hospital has had a difficult road to realisation, struggling to raise the $100-million (R1.4-billion) needed to complete the project in the midst of a tough global economic environment and, more crucially during the last stages of the project, without the guidance and vision of the hospital’s patron, Nelson Mandela, who died in December 2013.

 

 

It’s a miracle, or just short of a miracle. The children’s hospital was a dream,” Sibongile Mkhabela, CEO of the Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund, told AFP during a media tour of the facilities in November 2016.

It was very difficult to do it without him … extremely difficult, but people were ready to hear us. People could relate to his vision. There is a number of ways that you can remember him; he was a statesman. You could build a statue … but at his core, he loved children.”

 

Nelson Mandela Children's Hospital - EntranceFinally breaking ground at its site in Parktown, Johannesburg in 2014, the hospital received financial support from a host of South African and international philanthropists and organisations, including the Bill Gates Foundation, Kellogg Foundation, Islamic Relief Worldwide and industrialist Eric Samson.

Additional financing came from donations made by millions of ordinary South Africans via SMS and through various fundraising events held since 2009.

The three-floor facility, which is part of the University of Witwatersrand’s medical faculty, specialises in paediatric cancer care, and kidney and lung treatment, as well as heart, chest and brain surgery, and a range of other children’s medical needs. While Africa does have four other paediatric specialist hospitals – one each in Cape Town and Nairobi, and two in Cairo – the new Johannesburg hospital is the most advanced facility in Africa.

Nelson Mandela Children's Hospital - Aerial ViewThe hospital is equipped with the latest medical equipment and technology, including the most advanced operating theatres in the country, offering the best all- inclusive diagnosis and treatment regime on the continent.

Equipment was able to identify and analyse the “minutest” details, hospital project leader Joe Seoloane leader told AFP, “(making) diagnoses that general equipment might not pick up”.

The hospital also provides real-time video conferencing, enabling doctors and medical students across the continent

With a staff of 450 expertly trained paediatric nurses and 150 specialist doctors sourced from South Africa and the rest of the world, the hospital offers free services to those from poorer backgrounds and only charges those who can afford it.

The brightly painted wards, colourful furnishings and the latest multimedia technology – including in-house radio and television channels tailored to its young patients – all help the hospital present a comforting and fun environment.

It’s a children’s hospital and must specialise in conditions that are unique to children,” Seoloane said. “(The hospital is) proud and excited that … on 2 December, we can officially say (Africa has a children’s hospital on par with the rest of the world).”

 

 

The NMCH has theatres that will provide lifesaving treatment to children across the spectrum, from neurology through to heart issues, and will be able to broadcast its operations around the world.

The facility has 200 beds and 10 theatres. It also boasts 17 dialysis machines and 7 imaging units that can treat up to 2 500 patients a month.

 

On top of this it’s home to more paediatric ICU beds, than all of Gauteng’s hospitals combined.

The hospital logo of animated faces was designed by children, as was the wallpaper in the wards and along the corridors.

The beds at the hospital have also been designed — by a University of Johannesburg student — to be more child-friendly.

Parents can talk to their child through the clear plastic and all sides come down, the philosophy being that healing happens in happier spaces.

The top floor of the hospital has 27 rooms for families and hopes to have its corridors bustling with patients by mid-2017.

 

 

 

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About LFCT

This is a blog about CHILDHOOD CANCER and CHILDHOOD CANCER AWARENESS Little Fighters Cancer Trust is a non-profit organisation that offers support and aid to Children with Cancer and their families. When a child is diagnosed with cancer it affects the whole family. One of the parents, usually the mother, must give up their job to care for the child and this creates financial problems for the family. In South Africa especially the majority of these families are not well-to-do; many of them are rural. A diagnosis of cancer can wipe out any family’s finances, let alone a poor family. The costs of special medications, special diets, hospital stays, transport to and from the hospital or clinic and accommodation and food costs for the mother who spends most of the time at her child’s bedside are astronomical. These are the people and problems that fall through the cracks, and these are the people that Little Fighters Cancer Trust has pledged to help in any way possible. LFCT takes a holistic approach to assisting the Children with Cancer and their Families, with the main aim to be the preservation of individual dignity and pride. Little Fighters Cancer Trust also focuses on promotion and advocacy of National Childhood Cancer Awareness in an effort to increase awareness of Early Warning Signs of Childhood Cancer. This would result in earlier diagnosis, giving the Child with Cancer more of a chance at Treatment and Survival. See "About" for more Background info

Posted on 2 December, 2016, in Blog, Videos and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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