Category Archives: Advice & Tips

Top Cancer Stem Cell Killing Nutrients


Our diets can both feed or starve cancer cells productivity by affecting multiple mechanisms which promote cancer. Cancer cells rely on the ability to multiply, repair, differentiate and evade apoptosis (programmed cell death). The recent discovery of cancer stem cells has scientists looking at a whole new approach to preventing and treating cancer.

Cancer stem cells have a pro-survival strategy involved in promoting cancer cell invasion, growth and metastasis.

These cancer stem cells are unlike typical stem cells because they are designed to promote cancerous activities including: the ability to self-renew; resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs; self-sufficient; not influenced by anti-growth signals or by contact with other stem cells; not regulated by normal cell functions including apoptosis; promote inflammation; regulated by tissue invasion and metastasis; sustained by angiogenesis and flawed cellular energy.

Fortunately, cancer stem cells are affected by phytochemicals or the nutrients in our diets. These nutrients are designed to prevent and treat the pro-survival cancerous properties which equip a cancer stem cell to function.

Read the rest of this entry

Advertisements

Questions Parents Should Ask When a Child Completes Cancer Treatment


While the first emotions that parents will feel when their child has completed their cancer treatment are tremendous joy and relief, the event may also be a bit traumatic.

You may feel scared, as you and your child with cancer have suddenly come to the end of a journey of a couple of months or years, during which time you had the support of the hospital/clinic and a oncological team… now you are suddenly on your own…

This is completely normal as while one has to continue the fight, continue to be strong, doing what must be done, adrenaline takes over  and keeps you going – once the fight is over the adrenaline subsides and fear and uncertainty can creep in.

Some parents have described this time as feeling like veterans who have just returned from war – exhausted and unsure of how to go forward…

For this reason, it is important that you think about the end of treatment before the day actually comes, so that you do not feel lost and all out at sea when it does.

Read the rest of this entry

5 Things Female Childhood Cancer Survivors Should Know


While there has been much improvement in long-term survival rates for childhood cancer patients – more than 80% of children diagnosed with cancer are alive at least 5 years after diagnosis – there are many challenges for the survivors.

Many will ultimately be considered cured. As a consequence, interest is growing in the long-term health of these survivors.

Among the long-term survivors are women facing gynaecological health issues from the late effects of their treatment.

The good news for females who have survived Childhood Cancer is that they are far more likely to be able to become pregnant than male survivors.

It is important that parents of Children with Cancer think about the possible late-effects of the cancer and keep records of all treatments, medications, set-backs and any other information they can just in case it is needed later in life.

Read the rest of this entry

Managing Behaviour When Your Child Has Cancer


The natural response for any parent when they first learn their child has cancer is to do anything possible to make them happy. It is, however, important to balance the desire to comfort with an understanding of what is in your child’s best interest. This is especially true when your child with cancer exhibits difficult behaviours.

Even as your child and the rest of the family are going through this exceedingly stressful time, it is crucial that you maintain your parental role. Give yourself time to accept the realities of your child’s medical diagnosis, but trust your instincts regarding the behaviours you want to maintain, and those that you are more willing to let go.

While you may be faced with many challenges, and those challenges will change over time, the best thing that you can actually do for your Child with Cancer and the rest of the family, including yourself, is to keep life as normal as possible for your children.

Read the rest of this entry

✨Foodie Friday ✨How to Incorporate Cancer-Fighting Herbs into your Diet


Following on from the article we posted a few days ago, “Creating a Cancer-Fighting Indoor Herb Garden,” today we are going to give you some ideas on how to incorporate those herbs into your and your Child with Cancer’s diet.

While you probably know how to use most of these herbs, there may be some with which you are not that familiar and unsure of how they should be used.

Learning more about these herbs and how to use them in different foods can be some fun that you and your child(ren) can share…. from planting to how they grow to harvesting to using them….

These herbs are really good for fighting cancer, so it is important that you make them part of your Child with Cancer’s diet – the rest of the family will also benefit from their use, and they can add great taste to your dishes too.

In the following weeks we will also give you some great easy recipes to make using these herbs.

Read the rest of this entry

Effects of Childhood Cancer on Parents’ Relationship


Parents who are dealing with caring for a Child with Cancer undergo huge amounts of stress, and generally experience both positive and negative changes in their relationships, communication, stress, and their roles.

Emotions run the gamut; anger, anxiety, guilt, and distress will all ebb and flow during the course of the child’s illness. Childhood cancer is a family affair, and while these emotions will generally all be expressed at one time or another by all family members, expression is generally more overt from mothers and children.

Childhood Cancer affects the family’s needs in a myriad of ways such as self-esteem, social interaction, their need for care, and general functioning. This may cause the parents to have to change or modify their family roles to cope with the demands of their child’s illness.

Read the rest of this entry

Cancer Caregiver Stress, Depression & Burnout


Being a caregiver for a person with cancer takes its toll on one’s health, and even more so when the person with cancer is your child.

Caregivers of Children with Cancer (usually the mother) are faced with far more stress, as they usually have to give up their job, spend endless hours at their child’s bedside in the hospital – sometimes for weeks or even months at a time, make endless trips to doctors, clinics and hospitals, and still try to be there for the rest of the family. Childhood Cancer unfortunately often ends in divorce, which places even more of a burden on the mother and the stress becomes far worse and can often turn into depression or burnout.

While it is natural to want to stay by your sick child’s side and meet the needs of their siblings and other family members – all at once, this is a virtually impossible task, and unless you give both your mind and your body a break once in a while, you could well end up with caregiver-burnout!

When one continuously cares for others while under tremendous stress, one can begin to feel that you’re in over your head and have little control over the situation – this can cause the stress to begin taking a toll on your health, relationships, and state of mind—eventually leading to burnout.

When you are burned out, it’s tough to do anything, let alone look after your ill child, which is  why taking care of yourself is not a luxury; it is a necessity! There are plenty of things you can do to rein in the stress of caregiving and regain a sense of balance, joy, and hope in your life.

Read the rest of this entry

Foodie Friday: Nutritional e’Pap Recipes


Yesterday we gave you some important information about e’Pap, a revolutionary nutrient-loaded porridge that was created to cater to the feeding needs of HIV patients and babies.

Nutrient content in fruit and vegetables has dropped up to 76% over the past 50 years in the USA and Europe. Proof that modern intensive agriculture practices create the problem. The result is a global crisis of mass starvation of micro-nutrients in communities both rich and poor.

Such is the success of e’Pap in improving nutrition, energy and productivity for those who consume it, that up to two million servings a month of e’Pap are distributed in Africa.

e’Pap could be the answer for Children with Cancer – it is full of vitamins, cheap, and easy-to-make; it does not even require cooking so is suitable for use in even the remotest rural areas.

Read the rest of this entry

Preparing for the Anniversary of a Loved One’s Death


The 12 months following the death of a loved one is known as “the year of firsts” and for obvious reasons, is extremely difficult to get through. Dealing with the first birthday, Christmas, etc. is painful, and does not necessarily equip one to face that dreaded anniversary of the loss.

Grief is a complicated experience, partially because it never truly resolves itself but rather changes over time and meanders along different paths; some difficult and others not so difficult.

Facing the anniversary of a meaningful loss can completely blindside one, even though we know that it is coming and generally anticipate it with dread. Just as with other “stages” of grief, getting through this time can be immensely difficult and there is no right way or wrong way to approach it; the experience is different for each individual.

Every single person will be faced with losses of those we love and admire throughout our lifetime, and the loss of a child is always the worst.

 

Read the rest of this entry

How do I Prepare for My Child’s Death?


The approaching death of a child is likely to be the most difficult time in any parent’s life. Children are supposed to outlive their parents, not the other way around…

Dealing with your child’s cancer is all-consuming; it drains you and the rest of your family – of strength, of vitality, of joy, of finances, and leaves one feeling helpless and hopeless much of the time.

Many parents feel that, even though they have already been given the prognosis and know that their child is dying, to acknowledge it means that they are giving up… Other families feel that they need to get their affairs in order…

Everyone is different and copes in their own way – there is really no right or wrong way to cope with the impending death of a child – you just need to cope in whichever way feels right for you and your family, no matter what anyone else may think or say.

It is often believed that difficult times can bring a family together and make the family unit stronger, but hardships can also create divisions. This sometimes happens if one parent has been more involved in their child’s care, which could mean that they are further along with the various stages of understanding and preparation than the other parent.

Dealing with the trauma of a child with an incurable disease is difficult, and individuals can go through various stages of disbelief, anger, understanding, acceptance and preparation. It is individual though, and does not always occur in the manner that we would expect.

 

Read the rest of this entry

%d bloggers like this: