Blog Archives

Chemobrain in Childhood Cancer


23843263_sSymptom Management, Palliative Care, or Supportive Care to relieve side-effects is an important part of cancer care and treatment and should always form part of the  overall treatment plan.

Around 70% of cancer survivors report difficulties with memory and concentration after undergoing chemotherapy – this is conversationally referred to as “Chemobrain,” which is described as a mental clouding or fogginess, during and after cancer treatment.

Chemobrain refers to the cognitive impairment that can occur after cancer treatment. It’s not limited to people who undergo chemotherapy (surgery and radiation can also contribute), but it’s more noticeable if one has undergone chemotherapy.

Doctors used to dismiss patients who complained of brain fog after cancer treatment. It’s still unclear exactly how many patients among the 15-million-plus cancer survivors are affected.

Read the rest of this entry

Advertisements

What does The RACE for Children Act Mean?


Most paediatric cancer patients are subjected to treatments that are not designed for a child’s developing body.

This is because there has been too little research into Childhood Cancer and too few new medications to treat childhood cancer.

According to the Coalition against Childhood Cancer, a mere 4 % of America’s  National Cancer Institute’s budget is dedicated to paediatric cancer research – it is even less in some other countries.

Parents and advocates say that is not enough when you consider how much life these children stand to lose.

Treatment options for Children with Cancer have been stagnant for decades, with only 3 new drugs developed specifically to treat childhood cancers since 1980, compared to the 190 new treatments that have been approved for adults in the last 20 years alone.

The Research to Accelerate Cures and Equity for Children Act that was signed into U.S. law during August this year aims to change that.

Read the rest of this entry

Coping with Chemobrain in Childhood Cancer


23843263_sSymptom Management, Palliative Care, or Supportive Care to relieve side-effects is an important part of cancer care and treatment and should always form part of the overall treatment plan.

Around 70% of cancer survivors report difficulties with memory and concentration after undergoing chemotherapy – this is conversationally referred to as “Chemobrain,” which is described as a mental clouding or fogginess, during and after cancer treatment.

Chemobrain refers to the cognitive impairment that can occur after cancer treatment. It’s not limited to people who undergo chemotherapy (surgery and radiation can also contribute), but it’s more noticeable if one has undergone chemotherapy.

Symptoms of chemobrain can be very frustrating because no matter how well your child speaks or writes, it can cause them to forget words that they have used often, making them have to resort to saying “that thing” or “the thing” instead of “that car” or “the cat” for instance.

Chemobrain is partially based on body and mind fatigue. Animal studies have shown that chemotherapy may cause temporary reductions in cell growth in brain areas (e.g. the hippocampus) that control learning and memory.

 

Read more about the Effects, Signs and Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis and Treatment and more regarding Chemobrain on our static page, Chemobrain in Childhood Cancer

 

Laser Therapy Opens New Possibilities for Treatment of Brain Cancer


glioblastomaGlioblastomas are the most common and aggressive form of brain cancer and one of the most difficult cancers to treat. Most patients diagnosed with this type of brain tumour survive just 15 months, according to the American Cancer Society. Glioblastomas are generally found in the cerebral hemispheres of the brain, but can be found anywhere in the brain or spinal cord.

Glioblastomas (GBM) are tumours that arise from astrocytes—the star-shaped cells that make up the “glue-like,” or supportive tissue of the brain. These tumours are usually highly malignant (cancerous) because the cells reproduce quickly and they are supported by a large network of blood vessels.

Glioblastoma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor; however, glioblastoma in children is less common than in adults, and little is known about its clinical outcome in children. Most children diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme or anaplastic astrocytoma receive surgery and radiation, and in some cases chemotherapy.

There are many factors that affect that prognosis for a child with a glioma. The most important factor is the type of tumor. It is also very important if there were any tumor cells left after the tumor was removed. Some studies have shown that younger children have better prognosis than older children.

Read the rest of this entry

Kuruman Hospital Introduces Patient Transport & Overnight Accommodation


kuruman hospFor some rural patients, hundreds of kilometres and long nights spent sleeping in the cold can stand between them and care for complicated illnesses like cancer and drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB).

One Northern Cape hospital is making the journey a little easier.

The two new park homes are equipped with equipped with beds, showers and toilets

In many places, care for complicated illnesses such as cancer and even DR-TB remain centralised at provincial or specialist hospitals.

To reach these services, many rural patients must travel to their nearest local hospital to catch patient transport buses that will ferry them to the larger specialist or provincial hospitals farther afield for treatment.

Read the rest of this entry

Xuané… a Reason to Smile Part 8


xuane ...a Reason to Smile

 Xuané Niewenhuis
17 August 2006 – 24 October 2014
Forever ^8^

Xuané…

a Reason to Smile

By:

Theresa Botha Nieuwenhuis

2009 – 2013 (continued)

A week later her doctor informed me that they would try chemotherapy for 3 months, after which they wold do another MRI to see whether the chemo had worked, and would then give her another 3 months of chemo.

And yes, my first thought was that now my child’s hair would fall out, and I know it is 40345_1silly, but one does think about it, because “how was she going to feel? How would she react and how would other people react? We were going to become part of this sympathetic family where people looked at you and stared, and I did not want to be a part of that family.

We realised that Xuané did not really have control over her bladder anymore and often wet her bed, so we decided to put her back on nappies to spare her the embarrassment. She went through between 13 and 15 nappies per day and it was difficult to keep up because the nappies became very expensive, and I had to start depending on others for help.

It is strange how people support one when you are going through difficult times; many want to come and pray, others want to help financially… I accepted the prayers but did not want to accept financial help; I asked that people rather bought nappies to help as our medical aid covered her operations and treatment.

Read the rest of this entry

Dates I Remember…


A child's death forever changes a family and those who love them. The experience of grief is lifelong - it does not go away after a certain amount of time. Yes, it softens but always there is a place in your heart and your soul that yearns for that child

Today we would like to share with you a piece written by Theresa Botha Nieuwenhuis,  Xuané’s mommy.  The piece was originally written in Afrikaans (shown below English version) but it is so powerful that we translated it so that everyone could understand what the death of a child from childhood cancer does to a mother…

Read the rest of this entry

The Purple Almond

Food for the body, mind and soul

Wendy, A different kind of woman

My journey with Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Liposarcoma

COPPERSTONE

Event Production & Creative Agency

My Name is Chuma

a blog from a Cape Town inner city artist

The Average South African

Food // Travel // Lifestyle

You Are The Cure

Campaign for children with Leukaemia

Knitting Rays of Hope

Spreading Hope...a hat at a time.

lovehopeandcourage

Inspired by ordinary people doing extraordinary things

Surviving The Bubble

Jamie Hutchings, Public speaker, leukemia survivor and depression fighter

beingmommie.com

Sharing my learnings of being a mother

%d bloggers like this: