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Dedicated to Those Who Are Missing Someone Today


Christmas is not a happy time for everyone – there are many individuals for whom the Festive Season is very painful as it is the time that they miss those who are gone the most.

For parents who have lost a child, whether to cancer or anything else, this is a really, really, difficult time of the year because Christmas is about the children, after all…

Today we would like to take a moment to send out some love to all parents who have lost a child/children.

While the first Christmas is particularly poignant, each Christmas without your child will bring its own challenges, and each parent has to grieve in his or her own way.

There is not much that anyone can say that will take away your pain, but we here at the Little Fighters Cancer Trust would just like to let you know that we are holding you close in our hearts today and are sending you as much Love & Peace as your heart can hold.

 

Sending you Angel Blessings
( `\( ). .•°*”˜
¸.•´¯`•...✫ (⁀‵⁀,)
..` /
\_/¯…………`•.¸¸. . . . . . . ´
.(_/’/……………………`•.¸
`•.
…\ \ …
…./ /…
Sprinkling Love, Light & Healing
….\/ ….
Peace, Love & Harmony Your Way

 

Read the rest of this entry

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How can I Help My Grieving Friend/Family Member?


lost love is still love

One of the things that we try to do during Bereaved Parents Awareness Month is to help the grieving parents make some sense of how they are feeling, to encourage them to give themselves permission to grieve according to their own schedule irrespective of what other may feel or think.

Another is to try to help friends and family understand what it is like to lose a child; what the grieving parents are going through and how best to act around them and help them through this tragedy that has overtaken their lives, which is what today’s post will cover.

When a child dies, the parents will be in shock, even if it is a death after a long-fought battle against an illness like cancer. The bottom of their world has just dropped out from under them, and they will be going through a range of emotions such as disbelief, denial, confusion, anger, hysteria, resentment, anxiety, panic, depression, and a lot more besides.

There is generally no shortage of help when a death first occurs, but unfortunately that soon seems to dry up, as though once the funeral has happened it is all over and done with and everything should just go back to normal, and this is just not so – especially with the death of a child! Read the rest of this entry

The Mourner’s Bill of Rights


Losing a child is the most painful experience that any parent can be asked to go through, especially when it is a young child that they have had to watch go through the devastating, frightening, physically and emotionally crippling battle against cancer.

Losing a child is like losing one’s heart and then being expected to carry on with life as though everything is still the same – and it isn’t.

People expect you to act and behave in a specific manner, and they have no right; they mumble inane well-meaning but awkward, insensitive phrases like “He’s in a better place,” “Everything happens for a reason,” or “You’re lucky to have other children,” and “Time will heal all,” or “You must get on with your life now.”

In our second article in this Bereaved Parents Awareness Month we would like to once again extend our heartfelt sympathies to all parents who have lost a child/children and remind you that NOBODY has the right to tell you how to grieve, how long to grieve, or anything else about YOUR grief!

Read the rest of this entry

Losing a Child is Painful


crying is a releaseThe loss of a child is probably the most painful experience any parent can endure.

July is International Bereaved Parents Awareness Month and during this time the Little Fighters Cancer Trust would like to remember and reach out to all those parents who have lost their children to Cancer.

The loss of a child is the most inconsolable of losses; It violates the natural order of things. Here at LFCT we unfortunately see too many parents face this devastating loss, and it breaks our hearts every time we do, but even we cannot really say that we know what they are feeling.

International Bereaved Parents Awareness Month is a time to reach out to bereaved parents and their families by giving them someone who will listen to them without trying to give them advice as to how to feel or act; someone to just “be there” for them, to give them a shoulder to cry on or a hug if they need it, or to just let them talk…

Read the rest of this entry

Dedicated to Those Who Are Missing Someone Today


Christmas is not a happy time for everyone – there are many individuals for whom the Festive Season is very painful as it is the time that they miss those who are gone the most.

For parents who have lost a child, whether to cancer or anything else, this is a really, really, difficult time of the year because Christmas is about the children, after all…

Today we would like to take a moment to send out some love to all parents who have lost a child/children.

While the first Christmas is particularly poignant, each Christmas without your child will bring its own challenges, and each parent has to grieve in his or her own way.

There is not much that anyone can say that will take away your pain, but we here at the Little Fighters Cancer Trust would just like to let you know that we are holding you close in our hearts today and are sending you as much Love & Peace as your heart can hold.

 

Sending you Angel Blessings
( `\( ). .•°*”˜
¸.•´¯`•...✫ (⁀‵⁀,)
..` /
\_/¯…………`•.¸¸. . . . . . . ´
.(_/’/……………………`•.¸
`•.
…\ \ …
…./ /…
Sprinkling Love, Light & Healing
….\/ ….
Peace, Love & Harmony Your Way

 

Read the rest of this entry

Preparing for the Anniversary of a Loved One’s Death


The 12 months following the death of a loved one is known as “the year of firsts” and for obvious reasons, is extremely difficult to get through. Dealing with the first birthday, Christmas, etc. is painful, and does not necessarily equip one to face that dreaded anniversary of the loss.

Grief is a complicated experience, partially because it never truly resolves itself but rather changes over time and meanders along different paths; some difficult and others not so difficult.

Facing the anniversary of a meaningful loss can completely blindside one, even though we know that it is coming and generally anticipate it with dread. Just as with other “stages” of grief, getting through this time can be immensely difficult and there is no right way or wrong way to approach it; the experience is different for each individual.

Every single person will be faced with losses of those we love and admire throughout our lifetime, and the loss of a child is always the worst.

 

Read the rest of this entry

How can I Help My Grieving Friend/Family Member?


the moment your heart stopped beating

 

One of the things that we try to do during Bereaved Parents Awareness Month is to help the grieving parents make some sense of how they are feeling, to encourage them to give themselves permission to grieve according to their own schedule irrespective of what other may feel or think.

Another is to try to help friends and family understand what it is like to lose a child; what the grieving parents are going through and how best to act around them and help them through this tragedy that has overtaken their lives, which is what today’s post will cover.

When a child dies, the parents will be in shock, even if it is a death after a long-fought battle against an illness like cancer. The bottom of their world has just dropped out from under them, and they will be going through a range of emotions such as disbelief, denial, confusion, anger, hysteria, resentment, anxiety, panic, depression, and a lot more besides.

There is generally no shortage of help when a death first occurs, but unfortunately that soon seems to dry up, as though once the funeral has happened it is all over and done with and everything should just go back to normal, and this is just not so – especially with the death of a child! Read the rest of this entry

Fathers Feel Loss Too


childlossaffectsfatherstoo

Today’s post is another one in our series of posts for Bereaved Parent’s Awareness Month and is going out to every Father out there who has lost a child.

Most articles, resources, etc. about grieving the loss of a child are geared towards the Mother, but what about Fathers who have lost a child?

Unfortunately, due to the way that society perceives “Manhood” in most countries, the Father of a child who has died is forgotten about most of the time.

The Little Fighters Cancer Trust would like to say to all Fathers out there who have lost children, “We SEE you and we recognise your Pain!

During hospital stays and the first days back at home after the death of a child, the focus of attention is usually on the Mother, and there is very little in the form of acknowledgement or support for the grieving Father who has also suffered a devastating loss.

Having to be the strong one, the one who supports the mother and the rest of the family; the one who makes all the phone calls, the one who tries to shield the grieving mother from as many calls as possible to let her come to terms with her own grief takes its toll on a Grieving Father.

Most men do not generally have the same sort of social networks that women have and may be used to relying on their partner for emotional support, so what do they do when their support needs support and leaves them with nobody to lean on and confide their deepest thoughts and fears to? Read the rest of this entry

Understanding Your Grief


dawn-will-break

 

In our previous article for Bereaved Parents Awareness Month we mentioned that there were various stages of grief. Not everyone goes through all the stages, and even those who do go through them do not necessarily go through them in the same order. While you may not go through them by rote, or go through all of them, you will definitely go through at least some of them.

Your pattern of progressing through your grief will be uneven, unpredictable and unique, with no specific time-frame.

As with most things in life, grief will be just a little easier to deal with if you understand the grieving process:

Understanding the Process and Knowing What to Expect can help you Cope Better. In the beginning it will seem as if your grief is directing you, but you can learn to direct your grief; once you understand what is happening to you and have some idea of what to expect, you will feel more in control of your grief and will be in a better position to take care of yourself, to find your own way through this loss and to slowly begin rebuilding your life. Read the rest of this entry

The Mourner’s Bill of Rights


grieving loss a process

 

Losing a child is the most painful experience that any parent can be asked to go through, especially when it is a young child that they have had to watch go through the devastating, frightening, physically and emotionally crippling battle against cancer.

Losing a child is like losing one’s heart and then being expected to carry on with life as though everything is still the same – and it isn’t. People expect you to act and behave in a specific manner, and they have no right; they mumble inane well-meaning but awkward, insensitive phrases like “He’s in a better place,” “Everything happens for a reason,” or “You’re lucky to have other children,” and “Time will heal all,” or “You must get on with your life now.”

In our second article in this Bereaved Parents Awareness Month we would like to once again extend our heartfelt sympathies to all parents who have lost a child/children and remind you that NOBODY has the right to tell you how to grieve, how long to grieve, or anything else about YOUR grief!

Read the rest of this entry

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