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Foodie Friday: Anti Side-Effect Recipes


It is important to eat small meals more often while undergoing conventional cancer treatments such as Surgery, Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy.

For those who are suffering side-effects such as dysphasia, sore mouths or nausea, consuming a nutrient dense smoothie for one meal and then trying some sun-dried fruits (without sugar) and untoasted nuts as a snack a few hours later is a good idea.

A lunch with salad greens, bitter herbs, apple slices, berries and a dressing made with lemon and olive oil, a pinch of cayenne pepper and avocado makes an exceptionally nutrient-dense meal.

This type of Ayurvedic diet plan will increase your sense of taste, smell, and appetite and help one heal and feel good.

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Remedies for Diarrhoea after Cancer Therapy


Conventional Cancer Treatments such as Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy unfortunately generally come with a variety of not-so-nice side effects, such as diarrhoea, one of the more dangerous side effects.

Diarrhoea can not only be painful, but it also removes important nutrients, probiotics, and water from the body. As a result, diarrhoea puts one at a higher risk for more trauma from infection and dehydration.

It is important to manage these side effects immediately to prevent further complications that will weaken your body. The best way to heal is to ensure that you eat only healthy foods and avoid problematic foods that are going to worsen your diarrhoea.

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Coping with Bleeding Problems in Childhood Cancer


Bleeding ProblemsSymptom Management, Palliative Care, or Supportive Care to relieve side-effects is an important part of cancer care and treatment and should always form part of the overall treatment plan.

A bleeding disorder occurs when the blood does not clot quickly enough, resulting in too much bleeding or bleeding that lasts a long time. Normal blood clotting (coagulation) is a complex process in which specialised blood cells (platelets) and different proteins in the blood (clotting or coagulation factors) clump together to heal broken blood vessels and control bleeding.

There is a delicate balance of coagulation factors that promote bleeding and those that promote clotting. Disorders of the blood clotting system occur when clotting factors are missing or damaged, when there is a low number of platelets, or when the platelets don’t work correctly. Learn more about clotting problems.

A physical examination and several blood tests, including a complete blood count (CBC), prothrombin time (PT or INR), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), platelet count, tests to check the speed of blood clotting, and tests to check for blood protein deficiencies will be carried out on your child by the doctor to diagnose a bleeding disorder.

 

Read more about the Effects, Signs and Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis and Treatment and more regarding Bleeding Disorders on our static page, Bleeding Problems

 

Coping with Attention, Thinking, or Memory Problems in Childhood Cancer


cognitiveSymptom Management, Palliative Care, or Supportive Care to relieve side-effects is an important part of cancer care and treatment and should always form part of the overall treatment plan.

Cognitive problems, also known as cognitive dysfunction or “chemo brain,” occur when one has trouble processing information, which includes mental tasks related to attention span, thinking, and short-term memory.

Up to 75% of individuals with cancer experience cognitive problems during treatment, and up to 35% have issues that continue for months after treatment has finished.

Young children (age 5 and younger) are more likely to have long-term cognitive problems, especially those who receive radiation therapy that is directed at the head, neck, or spinal cord; total body radiation; and/or chemotherapy delivered directly into the spine (intrathecal chemotherapy) or the brain (intraventricular chemotherapy). These cognitive problems can occur months or years after treatment ends and can continue into adulthood.

These difficulties generally vary in severity and often make it difficult to accomplish daily activities. If your child is experiencing serious cognitive problems, it is important that you discuss this with their doctor or a member of their health care team regarding ways to manage these issues.

 

Read more about the Effects, Signs and Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis and Treatment and more regarding Cognitive Problems on our static page, Attention, Thinking, or Memory Problems

 

 

Coping with Appetite Loss in Childhood Cancer


Appetite LossSymptom Management, Palliative Care, or Supportive Care to relieve side-effects is an important part of cancer care and treatment and should always form part of the overall treatment plan.

A poor appetite or even loss of appetite is common with cancer and cancer treatment, and children with cancer may not feel hungry at all, eat less than usual, or feel full after eating only a little bit of food.

Ongoing appetite problems may result in your child losing weight, not getting the nutrients from food that his or her body needs, and loss of muscle mass and strength, all of which are serious complications.  The combination of weight loss and muscle mass loss is called cachexia, or wasting.

Nutritional supplement drinks, medications that help food move through the intestine, and tube feeding (the use of a tube that passes through the nose into the stomach), can also be helpful when your child has no appetite or cannot eat.

Getting good nutrition and keeping a healthy weight are important parts of your child’s recovery and can help them cope better both physically and emotionally with the effects of cancer and cancer treatment.

 

Read more about the Effects, Signs and Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis and Treatment and more regarding Appetite Loss on our static page, Appetite Loss

 

 

Coping with Anaemia in Childhood Cancer


anemia-in-childrenSymptom Management, Palliative Care, or Supportive Care to relieve side-effects is an important part of cancer care and treatment and should always form part of the overall treatment plan.

Anaemia means that there is an abnormally low level of red blood cells and occurs when the body is losing blood, is not making enough blood, or destroys red blood cells. Anaemia is very common in children with cancer, especially in those receiving chemotherapy treatments.

Red blood cells contain haemoglobin, an iron protein that gives red blood cells their characteristic colour; its primary function is to transport oxygen from the lungs to the body tissue all over the body.

When the level of red blood cells is too low, some parts of the body do not get sufficient oxygen and cannot work properly. Anaemia causes most people to feel tired or weak. The fatigue associated with anaemia can lower one’s quality of life and ability to cope with cancer and treatment side effects.

 

Read more about the Effects, Signs and Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis and Treatment and more regarding Anaemia on our static page, Anaemia

 

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