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Living With Retinoblastoma ~ Part IV


retinoblastoma2Today we continue with Part IV, the final post of Living With Retinoblastoma, a fast growing eye-cancer which affects babies and young children.

Today’s post covers everything you need to know about your child going to school or going back to school after retinoblastoma, and includes some great tips on how to help your child cope.

Retinoblastoma affects about 1 in 15, 000 live births, and an estimated 9,000 children develop the cancer globally each year. These posts cover living with retinoblastoma for those who have either had treatment for or have been through enucleation (surgical removal of the eye).

The reason for the posts is to help both children with retinoblastoma and their parents cope for the next few years to the rest of their lives…

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Living With Retinoblastoma ~ Part III


Retinoblastoma_babyToday we continue with Part III of Living With Retinoblastoma, a fast growing eye-cancer which affects babies and young children.

Today’s post will cover living with a prosthetic or “special” eye, mainly from the child’s point of view, and with some good pointers for parents to help their Little Fighters to come to terms with their new special eye, physically and psychologically.

Retinoblastoma affects about 1 in 15, 000 live births, and an estimated 9,000 children develop the cancer globally each year. These posts cover living with retinoblastoma for those who have either had treatment for or have been through enucleation (surgical removal of the eye).

The reason for the posts is to help both children with retinoblastoma and their parents cope for the next few years to the rest of their lives…

 

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Living With Retinoblastoma ~ Part II


Today we continue with Part II of Living With Retinoblastoma, a fast growing eye-cancer which affects babies and young children.

Retinoblastoma affects about 1 in 15, 000 live births, and an estimated 9,000 children develop the cancer globally each year.

These posts cover living with retinoblastoma for those who have either had treatment for or have been through enucleation (surgical removal of the eye).

The reason for the posts is to help both children with retinoblastoma and their parents cope for the next few years to the rest of their lives.

Today’s post will concentrate on handling and cleaning the “special eye” as well as dealing with your own anxiety and that of your child.

 

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Living With Retinoblastoma ~ Part I


posters-sign-to-look-english-2Retinoblastoma is a fast growing eye-cancer which affects babies and young children. Tumours may form in one eye (unilateral) or both eyes (bilateral), and can spread outside the eye (extraocular retinoblastoma). Rarely, a separate tumour develops in the brain (trilateral retinoblastoma). This cancer typically develops before 3 years of age, and some children are born with tumours.

Retinoblastoma affects about 1 in 15, 000 live births, and an estimated 9,000 children develop the cancer globally each year.  Due to global population distribution, 90% of children with retinoblastoma live in economically developing countries.

The most common early sign of retinoblastoma is leukocoria, a white glow in the pupil (black circle) of the affected eye, seen in flash photographs. This reflection may be visible to the naked eye in dim light when cancer fills the eye, or in very young babies. Other signs include a squint (misaligned eyes), red, painful or swollen eye. Trilateral retinoblastoma causes a range of symptoms, depending on its location in the brain.

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