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FOODIE FRIDAY: The Wonderful & Nutritious Rosehip


 

Rosehip is part of the fruit that grows on the blossom of a wild rose called Rosa Canina. This rose grows mostly in Europe and parts of Africa and Asia – the plant grows up to ten feet tall and bears a white, very fragrant flower. Once the flower has bloomed, and all the petals have fallen off, the hip is picked and used in a wide variety of preparations.

Rosehips are high in beneficial micronutrients and phytonutrients such as vitamins A, B, C, E and K, and flavonoids. Rosehips contain as much as 20 x more vitamin C than oranges; a single tablespoon of rosehip pulp gives an adult more than the recommended daily allowance of 60 mg of Vitamin C.

Vitamin A is also beneficial to the immune system. It can help to prevent infections from both bacteria and viruses and fight off any infections that do occur.

Rosehips are often thought of as a great cancer preventative because they have carotenoids, polyphenols, flavonoids, leucoanthocyanins, and catechins.

Rosehips can be eaten raw, after being put through a blender, or soaked in water overnight and then cooked in the water for about half an hour.

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Foodie Friday: Healthy Vegetarian/Vegan Meals


foodiefriday-wp-logoA diagnosis of cancer and subsequent treatment can result in irregular food and fluid intake, weight loss, and nutritional deficiencies. There is frequently an increased need for calories and protein while there is usually a decreased appetite.

Chemotherapy, for example, works by killing or disabling cancer cells. Unfortunately, this targets not only the tumour, but some healthy tissues as well, including the lining of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.

While some of these drugs produce only mild side effects, others can pack a wallop. The effects of radiation therapy can be similar to those of chemotherapy, but these are usually related to the part of the body that is being treated. This means that radiation to the head, neck, chest, and abdomen can result in a lot of GI distress.

Side Effects That Cancer Patients Experience

  • Dry mouth
  • Sore throat
  • Open, sore areas in the mouth and/or throat
  • Loss or change of taste perception
  • Nausea with or without vomiting
  • Decreased appetite
  • Constipation or diarrhoea
  • Feeling of fullness after eating or drinking very small portions

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High Calorie/High Protein Diet for Children with Cancer


calorie-protein-pyramidNutrition is an important part of the health of all children, but it is especially important for Children with Cancer, who often have poor appetites as a result of the cancer itself, or due to the side-effects of the cancer treatments.

Both cancer and its treatments may affect a child’s appetite, tolerance to foods, and their body’s ability to use nutrients. Eating the right kinds of foods before, during, and after treatment can help a child feel better and stay stronger.

For parents of Children with Cancer, the challenges of enticing children to eat nutritious, healthy foods are even greater than those faced by parents of healthy children, and require untold levels of patience and creativity to overcome.

Cancer and cancer treatments can also affect the way your child’s body tolerates certain foods and its ability to process, store and appropriately use nutrients at a time when your child’s body needs the energy and nutrients from a healthy diet more than ever.

The nutrient needs of Children with Cancer vary from child to child. Your child’s doctor, nurses, and a registered dietitian can help identify nutrition goals and plan ways to help your child meet them.

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Great Recipes for Children with Cancer


Quick-Diets-3-Weight-Loss-Super-Foods-289x300Eating a balanced, nutritional diet is very important for good health, especially for Children with Cancer, as they need the correct kind of nutrition to make help their compromised immune systems fight the cancer and other infections.

Children with cancer need protein, carbohydrates, fat, water, vitamins, and minerals.

This is not always easy, however, as individuals with cancer often lose their taste for various foods due to the cancer treatments, and some treatments make one feel nauseous or make everything taste metallic.

It is also often difficult for parents who are struggling financially to try to find something that their child can actually stomach eating – sometimes they can only keep down something like cheesenax, and the parent, just grateful that they are at least eating something, will ply them with this snack – it is not nutritional however, so one needs to try other things.

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LFCT Food Crisis – Help Needed!!


breakfastWould YOU send YOUR child to school with only THIS in her stomach?

Well, this was what one of our Little Fighters had for breakfast yesterday because it was all that was in the house to eat and she had to have SOMETHING in her stomach before going to write exams.

On Friday we posted on our Facebook Page about an  SMS received the previous evening from a grandmother who is looking after her grandchild who has Cancer  (translated into English and edited to make it understandable)

Hi Mandie, I hope things are good on that side. Things are not that good on this side – we are struggling to keep our heads above water with food; can LFCT please help us. (Child’s name) and I had to go to (Hospital Name Removed) yesterday and again today and the transport cost us R600. We only have enough food left for tonight. Please help us.

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Best Nutrition for Children with Brain Cancer


Quick-Diets-3-Weight-Loss-Super-Foods-289x300It is vital that Children with Cancer, including Children with Brain Cancer, eat well-balanced, nutritional meals and snacks in order to maintain their weight, rebuild any tissue lost in treatment, and strengthen their immune system and power it to fight against the brain cancer.

The occurrence of malnutrition in children with childhood tumours is multifactorial and develops during therapy for cancer in 40-80% of children. Malnutrition is more commonly seen in patients with advanced neuroblastoma, Wilms tumour, Ewing sarcoma and advanced lymphomas.

Malnutrition is usually more severe with aggressive tumours in the later stages of malignancy. Children who have a poor nutritional status have lower survival rates compared to those with a good nutritional status.

The majority of childhood cancers are treated by combined modality therapy, including surgery, radiotherapy, and antineoplastic schedules commonly providing a variety of side effects, which may lead a child into a state of nutritional deprivation.

Each of these treatment modalities may produce injuries to major organ systems (liver and pancreas), and a combination of therapies could result in a synergism of adverse effects.

Multimodality therapies combined with the effects of the tumour itself affect nutritional status and damage rapidly growing cells, e.g., in the gastrointestinal tract, causing serious and undesirable symptoms. Read the rest of this entry

Nutrition and Cancer: 5 Things Every Cancer Patient Needs to Know


 

Video Transcript

Ty Bollinger: I can see from the place that you live that you understand the impact of nutrition. Talk about the impact of nutrition specifically on cancer. What is cancer and what does nutrition have to do with cancer?

Dr. Patrick Quillin: A broad expansive sort of global question here Ty. So forgive me if we take a couple of side spurs. My book, Beating Cancer with Nutrition, which has sold a half million copies and is considered the definitive work in that area. It’s been translated into five languages. I organized three international symposia on the subject of adjuvant or (more…)

Beating Colon Cancer Without Chemotherapy


Chris and familyWhen Chris Wark was 26 years old, he started feeling really unwell; he had a sharp and aching abdominal pain a few times per day, low energy, slight anaemia, some rectal bleeding, and a dark stool.

He was diagnosed with Stage IIIC T3 N2 M0 adenocarcinoma (Colon cancer) on 22 December 2003,  and had surgery on 30th December – 18 cm of his ileum and colon was removed along with a golf ball sized tumour (4.5 x 4 x 2 cm) and 49 lymph nodes, four of which tested positive for adenocarcinoma.

Colorectal cancer is the  #2 cause of cancer death in the U.S. and because surgery cannot cure colorectal cancer, doctors recommended that Chris undergo 9-12 months of chemotherapy after the surgery.

According to the National Cancer Institute, stage III colon cancer patients with one to three involved lymph nodes have significantly better survival than those with four or more involved nodes; Chris had four.

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