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Foodie Friday: Citrus Essential Oil Smoothie Recipes


Following on yesterday’s post Herbal Essential Oils Proven to Kill Cancer Cells and last week’s post, High Dose Vitamin C to Improve Cancer Treatment Outcomes Passes Human Safety Trial, today we are sharing some great smoothie recipes using citrus essential oils.

Smoothies are always good for Children with Cancer as it is one way that they can get the required nutrition, especially when suffering from sore mouths or are struggling to swallow as a result of their cancer treatments.

Many essential oils can also be used in recipes in place of the fruit, seed, or plant the essential oil is derived from, and citrus essential oils such as lemon, orange, lime, and grapefruit can be delicious substitutes for the juice and/or zest called for in a recipe.

Having essential oils on hand is always a good idea as they contain loads of goodness in a small bottle and one only needs to use a tiny bit at a time – 1 drop of citrus essential oil can generally substitute for 1 teaspoon of zest or 2 tablespoons of juice. If your recipe calls for the zest of the entire fruit, this works out to between 7-15 drops of its essential oil counterpart.

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Foodie Friday


Once again it is foodie Friday, and we are bringing you some great, nutritious recipes for your Child with Cancer that the whole family can enjoy.

It is vital that Children with Cancer, including Children with Brain Cancer, eat well-balanced, nutritional meals and snacks in order to maintain their weight, rebuild any tissue lost in treatment, and strengthen their immune system and power it to fight against the brain cancer.

The occurrence of malnutrition in children with childhood tumours is multifactorial and develops during therapy for cancer in 40-80% of children. Malnutrition is more commonly seen in patients with advanced Neuroblastoma, Wilms Tumour, Ewing Sarcoma and advanced lymphomas.

Malnutrition is usually more severe with aggressive tumours in the later stages of malignancy. Children who have a poor nutritional status have lower survival rates compared to those with a good nutritional status.

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FOODIE FRIDAY: Nutrition for Children with Brain Cancer


Nutrition is very important for Children with Cancer, because the presence of the tumour as well as the treatments that they undergo play havoc with their immune systems as well as various other systems in their little bodies.

A malignant tumour leads to changes in a child’s metabolism; their system is unable to regulate the expenditure of energy according to the reduced energy intake, leading to an ineffective use of nutrients and contributing to the development of malnutrition. Malnutrition can lead to lower survival rates in children with brain cancer.

Children with cancer, especially those with solid tumours, have reduced body protein stores due to whole body protein breakdown. This may occur as a result of the cancer itself, the treatment they are undergoing for their tumour, or complications of the disease.

 

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Types of Brain Tumours in Children


Brain tumours can be either primary (develop in the brain) or secondary (cancer from another part of the body spreads to the brain).

A primary brain tumour occurs when abnormal cells form in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumours are the most common type of tumour that develops in children, and they can affect children of any age.

The brain and spinal cord are closely linked and together they form the Central Nervous System (CNS). The spinal cord connects the brain with nerves in virtually every part of the human body. The brain controls many vital bodily functions.

More than 60% of brain tumours in children are located in the posterior fossa (the back compartment of the brain). The posterior fossa includes the cerebellum, the brainstem, and the fourth ventricle. Tumours in this area include:

  • Medulloblastomas(also called Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumours, Or Pnets);
  • Cerebellar Astrocytomas;
  • Brainstem Gliomas; and
  • Ependymomas

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Brain Tumours: Did You Know?


Brain tumours result in more deaths of children than any other disease, including other cancers, and the five-year survival rate is under 20%, which is extremely low seeing that the survival rate for other childhood cancers can be up to 80% these days.

There are more than 120 different types of tumour, making brain tumours a notoriously difficult disease to diagnose. Unfortunately, the brain is still one area of the human body that has not been conquered, and this includes brain cancer.

It is a wonder then that brain cancer treatments have not really changed in the last 35 years and brain tumour research is woefully under-funded.

During this year alone, in excess of 7 000 children will be diagnosed with a brain tumour. Brain and central nervous system tumours are the most common cancers among children and death from brain tumour has overtaken death from leukaemia as the leading cause of death in children.

Childhood brain cancer is not the same as adult brain cancer; a child’s brain is still developing, so brain tumours in children generally appear in different areas of the brain than adult tumours and they also act differently to adult tumours. Treatment options for Childhood Brain Cancer vary and are generally influenced by the age of the child.

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May is Brain Cancer Awareness Month


May is Brain Cancer Awareness Month! During the month of May, millions of individuals across the Globe “Go Grey for May” in support of Loved Ones who are or have suffered from brain cancer. Grey is the colour of the Brain Cancer Awareness Ribbon.

Show YOUR support for all our Little Fighters battling Brain Cancer by turning your Facebook pages GREY during the month of May (you will find some covers and profile pics you are welcome to use on our FB Page.)

Few challenges can compare to dealing with the news that a child in your family has a brain tumour. The emotional burden can seem beyond anyone’s ability to cope, and there are very difficult decisions involved in coming to terms with the diagnosis.

Brain cancer survival rates are low and have hardly changed for 30 years, despite significant increases in survival for other cancers. Treatment is challenging because it affects our most vital organ. Brain cancer costs more per person than any other cancer, yet only receives a small fraction of government cancer research funding.

Relative five-year survival for brain cancer has hardly changed for 30 years, increasing less than 2% between the periods of 1984-1988 and 2009-2013. Only two in ten people diagnosed with brain cancer will survive for at least five years. Between 1982 and 2014, brain cancer incidence and mortality trends showed little change. Read the rest of this entry

Nutrition for Brain Tumour Patients


children-with-cancer

Malnutrition at the diagnosis of cancer is not an uncommon finding in the developing world.

Nutrition is very important for Children with Cancer, because the presence of the tumour as well as the treatments that they undergo play havoc with their immune systems as well as various other systems in their little bodies.

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Malnutrition

Malnutrition describes the consequences of insufficient protein-energy intake. Malnutrition is an unspecific term used to define an inadequate nutritional condition. It is characterized by either a deficiency or an excess of energy with measurable adverse effects on clinical outcome. Malnutrition describes the consequences of insufficient protein-energy intake. An adequate protein-energy balance is a prerequisite for age-appropriate growth and maintenance.

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Understanding Brain Tumours


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“Understanding Brain Tumours”

Timothy Cloughesy, MD – University of California, Los Angeles

Original Webcast: September 27, 2012

A full transcript of the Webinar can be accessed HERE

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What is Brain Cancer?


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The human brain is a very complex organ, so much so that not even Medical Doctors really know everything about it yet, and for the everyday parent whose child has just been diagnosed with one or other form of brain cancer, the sudden influx of medical terminology can be completely intimidating and overwhelming.

We will attempt to explain the basics about various types of childhood brain tumours as simply as we can (although we will have to use the medical terminology too so that you can get used to it).
 
 
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Please refer to the Brain Tumour Glossary for explanations of any terms that you do not understand.

 

 

Bennie Bookworm
If there are terms in this article that do not appear in the glossary, you can also make use of the NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms (link on the right hand side of almost page every page if you ever need them again – look for Bennie Bookworm)

 

Brain tumours are abnormal growths, in the brain, and are the most common solid tumours in children. Brain tumours can either be malignant or benign. When a tumour is benign, it means that the tumour does not contain cancer cells.

Once a benign tumour is removed, it generally does not recur.   Most benign brain tumours have clear borders, which means that they do not invade surrounding tissue. Benign tumours can, however, cause symptoms that are very similar to cancerous tumours due to their size and location in the brain.

Brain cancer is the presence of one or more malignant tumours, which contain cancer cells and generally grow very quickly and invade surrounding tissue. Malignant/cancerous brain tumours rarely spread to other parts of the body, but can sometimes recur after treatment.

Sometimes brain tumours that do not contain cancer cells are also classified as malignant due to their size and location, and the damage they can do to vital functions of the brain.

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May is Brain Cancer Awareness Month


Go Grey for May

Good Day Little Fighter Friends,

May is Brain Cancer Awareness Month, and as such Little Fighters Cancer Trust will be doing a series of articles on Brain Cancer throughout the month.

For an overview on Brain Cancer in Children please refer to our Brain Cancer Page under Child Cancer Types.

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