Blog Archives

Liquid Biopsy New Hope for Precision Therapies for Retinoblastoma Tumours


Retinoblastoma is a type of eye cancer that develops in the light-sensitive lining of the eye, called the retina.

Retinoblastoma can occur at any age but mainly occurs in children younger than 5 years of age and most often in those younger than 2.

In many developing countries where tumours can progress until they literally burst out of eyes, retinoblastoma remains an often fatal diagnosis, whereas in other countries the survival rate has risen to 98%.

Retinoblastoma was one of the first cancers to have its genetic origins identified in the late 1980s — a finding that helped launch the current era of personalised treatments that have transformed treatment of breast, lung, and prostate cancer.

To date though, children who develop these rare tumours have not benefited from that wave of precision diagnostics and therapies. This is mainly due to the fact that doctors have not been able to biopsy the tumours for genetic information that could guide treatment, without removing the very eyes the clinicians are trying so hard to save.

You can read about our own Little Fighter, Helen’s story HERE

Read the rest of this entry

Advertisements

Retinoblastoma


Retinoblastoma Awareness Ribbon

Retinoblastoma is a type of eye cancer that develops in the light-sensitive lining of the eye, called the retina.

Retinoblastoma can occur at any age but mainly occurs in children younger than 5 years of age and most often in those younger than 2.

Retinoblastoma may occur in one or both eyes, but rarely spreads to other parts of the body. Although it is the most common eye tumour in children, it is a rare childhood cancer and accounts for about 3-4% of childhood cancers.

There are 2 Types of Retinoblastoma:

  • Inherited: Retinoblastoma is sometimes inherited from the parent; this is known as hereditary or germline retinoblastoma and is usually bi-lateral (in both eyes).
  • Non-Inherited: This type of Retinoblastoma generally occurs in only one eye (unilateral)

The main challenge of treating Retinoblastoma is the prevention of blindness, however approximately 98% of children with retinoblastoma are cured.

Read the rest of this entry

Helen’s Story – Retinoblastoma Part 2


 

Helen 2nd birthday mickey mouse party

Hey There,

Helen and mommy Siobahn here again – today we are going to continue with “Helen’s Story” because we want everyone out there to know about Childhood Cancer and about my cancer, Retinoblastoma.

Now that the problem had been diagnosed as Retinoblastoma, things moved along very quickly. The diagnosis was made on the Thursday and the operation to remove the eye was scheduled for the next Monday.

Helen underwent an MRI Scan as well as a Lumbar Puncture in order to determine whether cancer was present anywhere else in Helen’s body. Fortunately all tests came back negative and it was determined that the cancer was confined to Helen’s left eye.

Helen underwent surgery to remove the eye and she and mommy stayed overnight in ICU and in the normal Paediatric ward the next night, during which time Helen she had a plaster over her eye. The plaster was removed before she went home the next day and replaced by a transparent shield to prevent infection and was removed two weeks later.

A ball implant was inserted into the empty eye socket and Helen currently wears nothing over the eye  – she will get a prosthesis when she is a little bit older and able to handle the hygiene it requires (toddlers tend to play in the sand or touch unhygienic toys etc. and then rub their eyes).

Read the rest of this entry

Helen’s Story – Retinoblastoma Part 1


 

Helen 7 months old

Hi,

my name is Helen and my mommy and I would like to share my story with you so that more people can get to know about Childhood Cancer; in this case specifically Retinoblastoma.

Retinoblastoma is a type of eye cancer that develops in the light-sensitive lining of the eye, called the retina, and can occur at any age but mainly occurs in children younger than 5 years of age and most often in those younger than 2.

Retinoblastoma may occur in one or both eyes, but rarely spreads to other parts of the body. Although it is the most common eye tumour in children, it is a rare childhood cancer and accounts for about 3-4% of childhood cancers.

The main challenge of treating Retinoblastoma is the prevention of blindness, however approximately 98% of children with retinoblastoma are cured.

Read the rest of this entry

Living With Retinoblastoma ~ Part IV


retinoblastoma2Today we continue with Part IV, the final post of Living With Retinoblastoma, a fast growing eye-cancer which affects babies and young children.

Today’s post covers everything you need to know about your child going to school or going back to school after retinoblastoma, and includes some great tips on how to help your child cope.

Retinoblastoma affects about 1 in 15, 000 live births, and an estimated 9,000 children develop the cancer globally each year. These posts cover living with retinoblastoma for those who have either had treatment for or have been through enucleation (surgical removal of the eye).

The reason for the posts is to help both children with retinoblastoma and their parents cope for the next few years to the rest of their lives…

Read the rest of this entry

Living With Retinoblastoma ~ Part III


Retinoblastoma_babyToday we continue with Part III of Living With Retinoblastoma, a fast growing eye-cancer which affects babies and young children.

Today’s post will cover living with a prosthetic or “special” eye, mainly from the child’s point of view, and with some good pointers for parents to help their Little Fighters to come to terms with their new special eye, physically and psychologically.

Retinoblastoma affects about 1 in 15, 000 live births, and an estimated 9,000 children develop the cancer globally each year. These posts cover living with retinoblastoma for those who have either had treatment for or have been through enucleation (surgical removal of the eye).

The reason for the posts is to help both children with retinoblastoma and their parents cope for the next few years to the rest of their lives…

 

Read the rest of this entry

Living With Retinoblastoma ~ Part II


Today we continue with Part II of Living With Retinoblastoma, a fast growing eye-cancer which affects babies and young children.

Retinoblastoma affects about 1 in 15, 000 live births, and an estimated 9,000 children develop the cancer globally each year.

These posts cover living with retinoblastoma for those who have either had treatment for or have been through enucleation (surgical removal of the eye).

The reason for the posts is to help both children with retinoblastoma and their parents cope for the next few years to the rest of their lives.

Today’s post will concentrate on handling and cleaning the “special eye” as well as dealing with your own anxiety and that of your child.

 

Read the rest of this entry

Living With Retinoblastoma ~ Part I


posters-sign-to-look-english-2Retinoblastoma is a fast growing eye-cancer which affects babies and young children. Tumours may form in one eye (unilateral) or both eyes (bilateral), and can spread outside the eye (extraocular retinoblastoma). Rarely, a separate tumour develops in the brain (trilateral retinoblastoma). This cancer typically develops before 3 years of age, and some children are born with tumours.

Retinoblastoma affects about 1 in 15, 000 live births, and an estimated 9,000 children develop the cancer globally each year.  Due to global population distribution, 90% of children with retinoblastoma live in economically developing countries.

The most common early sign of retinoblastoma is leukocoria, a white glow in the pupil (black circle) of the affected eye, seen in flash photographs. This reflection may be visible to the naked eye in dim light when cancer fills the eye, or in very young babies. Other signs include a squint (misaligned eyes), red, painful or swollen eye. Trilateral retinoblastoma causes a range of symptoms, depending on its location in the brain.

Read the rest of this entry

Innovative Hand-Held OCT Probe Takes High-resolution Images of Children’s Retinas


Handheld Device with cellular resolutionResearchers and ophthalmologists from Duke University have presented a new option to examine children’s eyes in a new study entitled “In vivo cellular-resolution retinal imaging in infants and children using an ultracompact handheld probe” published in Nature Photonics.

The new handheld device is about the same size as a pack of cigarettes, weighs next to nothing and is capable of gathering detailed information about the retina’s cellular structure.

The device is being hailed as a great achievement as up to now it has been very difficult to gather data as to how a child’s retina develops, as it matures by the age of 10. This has severely impacted and limited knowledge of how diseases affect a child’s vision early in life and has made diagnosing various diseases more difficult.

The human eye presents an extraordinary opportunity for research and imaging because it is easy to access; it is relatively self-contained; improvements in function can be easily measured, and there is even a natural opening that allows us to peer inside. The eye is also delicate though, with complex vital structures concealed mere millimetres below various surfaces, which necessitates the use of a wide range of technologies to study it.

Read the rest of this entry

Know the Glow ~ Retinoblastoma


retinoblastomaRetinoblastoma is a type of eye cancer that develops in the light-sensitive lining of the eye, called the retina.

The White Eye Detector or CRADLE (ComputeR Assisted Detector of LEukoria) cellphone app helps parents detect the appearance of white eye in pictures of their children. A white pupil can be a normal photographic effect in pictures (like red-eye, but white).

Retinoblastoma can occur at any age but mainly occurs in children younger than 5 years of age and most often in those younger than 2.

Retinoblastoma may occur in one or both eyes, but rarely spreads to other parts of the body. Although it is the most common eye tumour in children, it is a rare childhood cancer and accounts for about 3-4% of childhood cancers.

There are 2 Types of Retinoblastoma:

  • Inherited: Retinoblastoma is sometimes inherited from the parent; this is known as hereditary or germline retinoblastoma and is usually bi-lateral (in both eyes).
  • Non-Inherited: This type of Retinoblastoma generally occurs in only one eye (unilateral)

The main challenge of treating Retinoblastoma is the prevention of blindness, however approximately 98% of children with retinoblastoma are cured.

Read the rest of this entry

Cancer And Nicole

Blogging to keep myself sane throughout my cancer diagnosis.

sophstories

remission life

Jake’s Dragon Foundation

Dragons Fighting Pediatric Cancer

Wendy, A different kind of woman

My journey with Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Liposarcoma

COPPERSTONE

Event Production & Creative Agency

My Name is Chuma

a blog from a Cape Town inner city artist

The Average South African

Food // Travel // Lifestyle

You Are The Cure

Campaign for children with Leukaemia

Knitting Rays of Hope

Spreading Hope...a hat at a time.

lovehopeandcourage

Inspired by ordinary people doing extraordinary things

%d bloggers like this: